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20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
with her? >> jon stewart ripped her to shreds. >> the point that's valid is we are big city folk. in the smaller, rural parts of the country and you can speak to the congressmen representing the districts the post office is the central meeting place. i have never been to these places. there is something going on there. i respect that. >> if you go on a listening tour. >> i should. >> you're making the right point. this point will come up later with the military. it's so widely distributed. everybody has an impact on this. we do live in big cities but people in kansas don't have the same relationship. >> shouldn't have to pay for that. >> you can't have everything you want in life. i have a number. $47 trillion. do you know what $47 trillion is? from the cbo, congressional budget office, that's u.s. federal spending for the next ten years. $47 trillion. okay? can we agree that's a big number? now the post office will add to that number. i think we should be subtracting from that number. i don't care what sentimentality or who claire mchaskill is. she shouldn't have run the race. s
.s. home prices continued to rise through december of last year. the ten-city composite up 5.9%. the 20-city composite up 6.8%. david blitzer is the chairman of the s&p 500 index committee. david, welcome back. good morning. >> good morning. >> pretty good numbers to close out the year. people still trying to get their arms around how distressed properties are moving some of these prices, especially in key markets. >> that's right. i think the overall picture is very, very strong. the national index, which is up 7.3% for the four quarters, ended with the end of 2012. so really, all across the country things look good. only one city of all 20 was down on the year-over-year basis. >> still, though, i'm told the index is heavily skewed by the share of distressed. that's why atlanta could be down 17%. and now up 10% year-over-year. are these numbers, are they reflective of what's happening with real buyers? >> yes, i think they are reflective of what's actually happening with real buyers. what we've seen in city after city over the last couple of years is the city will get hit with a wave o
of the u.s., it is cricket city. 37 in kansas city with clouds. 31 in minneapolis. and back out west we go, rain in seattle. and it, look like partly cloudy skies for much of central and southern california. now, what about travel? what can you expect today as you head out to the airways? at a couple of the airports, you could see some delays. minor delays delays expected in new york. the mix of travels. a mix of rain and is snow in spots lot of cleveland. there you go, guys. let's send it back to you in new york. >> reynolds, we were just talking about sorkin on the best dressed list and you may not be on it, but this is the guy that might replace it. loot him. >> thank you so much. >> you know what? i think he knew he was going to be back on squawk today. it's been a while and you said i'm going to be back on "squawk box." >> got the pocket square going. >> representing. >> and the hair is high .tight today, too, right? when was that done, yesterday? >> high and tight. my dad, god rest his soul, was a high and tight man. >> do you miss us on the days on -- >> every day. a day without "sq
basically the chicago city workers, the chicago public unions are all going to be put into the health insurance exchanges. that is the way chicago is going to get out of whatever it is, its $8 billion unfunded liability. if he does it, then cities and states all across the country are going to dump their union employees right into the health insurance exchange and that is going to break the bank completely. >> that's exactly right. and that's exactly what they're asking in this provision now with these jointly run employer union plans. we want to be able to send our employees to these exchanges. the law is already costing 2.6 trillion over ten years. what would that do? and then who's to say that it's -- of course you couldn't just limit it to union employees. anybody who has a job should then be able to get coverage. >> but the idea of putting these government union workers into the exchange was not -- as far as i know, was not ever really expected. i mean, phil, this is a new twist. for rahm emanuel -- maybe it's very clever. get out from under his unfunded liability. maybe the u.s.
. >>> it was a budget day in hong kong. we'll head out east to get all the data as the city's poised to enjoy a return to higher growth. >>> and we fly tout singapore to speak to the global head of trade at hspc who think that the face of trade is changing as more high-end products are due to be exported out of emerging markets. >>> bides all of that -- besides all of that, the focus is on the auction in italy. that will hit the tape in an hour and ten minutes. how much will italy have to pay for its political impasse? rome looking to sell between three and four billion euros of a ten-year issue. this was the six-month auction producing the most since 2012, up around 50 basis points. this is where the euro is trading ahead of the auction. 130.79 where we stand currently. yesterday we were down at seven-week low of around 1,317 -- 1.3017. it's warned in italy that a loss of investor confidence could increase borrowing costs and reignite the debt crisis. as for italy's politicians, the leader of the center left coalition has vowed that he would try to form a government and seek an alliance that would re
. it's really a tale of two cities, right? you've got the market feeling great from the get-go, mutual fund inflows. you feel the market wanted to go higher in january. it carried over a little bit into february. but there's been no follow-through really on the volume. and the other metrics you would look at. a little better on options. so it's interesting. now the question is, do things like sequestration and what's going on in italy right now throw us a few curveballs we don't really need right now. >> or maybe our volume levels are down for good. >> could be. >> people just say that's the wave. >> the investors are certainly turning over their portfolios less than they were. they're moving into higher asset classes now. maybe we have to get used to a new normal on volumes. >> derivatives strong, divide that up pretty good in the yields. that can work for everybody. >> i think the strategy in the merger really is a divide and conquer strategy. stapling on our interest rate complex to their commodity and energy franchise. gives us more time to focus on the nyse assets here. so i'm exc
in and dig out. another big concern especially in some of the areas outside of the city is a loss of power. these winds are going to get to hurricane strength in some areas, and that's going to threaten the power lines. now, over the last day or day and a half, we've obviously seen a run on all of the hardware and home improvement stores in this area. but also the grocery stores. people getting the food they need to sustain themselves for several days, saying they realize they will probably be in their homes for an extended period of time. that's the very latest here in boston. i'm jay gray, nbc news. now back to you. >> all right. many thanks to jay gray. we appreciate it. >>> now, the president might have some senate democrats on his side as they scramble to find replacement cuts for the march 1st across the board sequester. but according to the latest from ace pollster scott rasmussen, only 36% of likely voters think oklahoma should find a way to stop the automatic cuts from going into effect. scott rasmussen, founder and president of rusmussen report joined me. scott as always welcome
small trading companies around the world, some based in cities right here in the united states. >> are you a procurement agent for iran? >> [chortles] no, that's ridiculous. no. >> but of course that's sort of the implication of the case against you. >> i'm nothing to do with iranian government or things like that at all. >> mohammad vaghari, mitch to his friends, an iranian who's lived in the united states for 15 years, is facing up to 85 years in prison. he and his lawyers are preparing for his trial on charges that he conspired to send u.s. technology to iran through a trading company he set up in his basement apartment in philadelphia. you are charged with trying to buy a centrifuge that could be used to make biological weapons, like anthrax. >> i don't know about that. i'm not a biological expert to tell, you know-- >> that's in the affidavit and is part of... >> sure. >> the charges against you? >> yes. that's what they say. >> he says his client for the centrifuge was a science lab at a university in dubai. but he says he never bought it. he only asked for its price. >>
a little bit more with tina ford, who is senior political analyst at citi. it's a shame we couldn't get the full information in. we've now got with the gridlock here, what is -- i know there are many options. what do you think is the most likely? is a fresh election more likely than us coupling together some kind of coalition? >> i don't think so. at least not yet. to address your question, the next government probably won't last its full five-year term. however, fresh -- >> what is the next government? >> well, we'll get to that. there's no mon date here for austerity. you have a fragmentation amongst political parties, cobbling together a coalition is going to be difficult. historically, a coalition takes three to four weeks and it's not likely to be any quicker with this result. we are looking in the short term in weeks and probably months of political uncertainty. we have presidential elections coming, too. but in terms of fresh elections, they can't happen as quickly as they did in greece where they happened a month later. >> bettrsani will be first up trying to form a government.
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)